Sunday, July 31, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 117

Title: Reality outran apprehension; Captain Ahab stood upon his quarter-deck.

11 x 7.75 inches
colored pencil and ink on found paper
December 29, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 116

Title: But it was especially the aspect of the three chief officers of the ship, the mates, which was most forcibly calculated to allay these colorless misgivings, and induce confidence and cheerfulness in every presentment of the voyage.

6.25 x 9 inches
ink on found paper
December 28, 2009


Saturday, July 30, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 115

Title: For several days after leaving Nantucket, nothing above hatches was seen of Captain Ahab.

6 x 5.25 inches
ink on found paper
October 3, 2010

(This is the second version of this illustration, and was re-drawn much later. I will post the first version, along with the other alternate versions I did for other pages, after I finish posting all 552 of the Moby-Dick illustrations that were published in my book Moby-Dick in Pictures.)





MOBY-DICK, page 114

Title: Third among the harpooneers was Daggoo, a gigantic, coal-black negro-savage, with a lion-like tread - an Ahasuerus to behold. Suspended from his ears were two golden hoops, so large that the sailors called them ring-bolts...

11 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint, ink and marker on found paper
December 27, 2009


Friday, July 29, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 113

Title: Next was Tashtego, an unmixed Indian from Gay Head, the most westerly promontory of Martha's Vineyard, where there still exists the last remnant of a village of red men, which has long supplied the neighboring island of Nantucket with many of her most daring harpooneers.

8 x 5.75 inches
colored pencil, ink and marker on found paper
December 26, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 112

Title: The third mate was Flask, a native of Tisbury, in Martha's Vineyard. A short, stout, ruddy young fellow, very pugnacious concerning whales, who somehow seemed to think that the great Leviathans had personally and hereditarily affronted him; and therefore it was a sort of point of honor with him, to destroy them whenever encountered.

10 x 8.5 inches
acrylic paint, ink and marker on found paper
December 23, 2009


Thursday, July 28, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 111

Title: Stubb was the second mate. He was a native of Cape Cod; and hence, according to local usage, was called a Cape-Cod-man. A happy-go-lucky; neither craven nor valiant; taking perils as they came with an indifferent air...

10 x 8.5 inches
acrylic paint, colored pencil and ink on found paper
December 21, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 110

Title: Men may seem detestable as joint stock-companies and nations; knaves, fools, and murderers there may be; men may have mean and meagre faces; but man, in the ideal, is so noble and so sparkling, such a grand and glowing creature, that over any ignominious blemish in him all his fellows should run to throw their costliest robes.

11 x 8.5 inches
colored pencil and ink on found paper
December 20, 2009


Wednesday, July 27, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 109

Title: "I will have no man in my boat," said Starbuck, "who is not afraid of a whale."

7.75 x 11 inches
colored pencil, ink and marker on found paper
December 19, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 108

Title: The chief mate of the Pequod was Starbuck, a native of Nantucket, and a Quaker by descent. He was a long, earnest man...

10 x 8.5 inches
acrylic paint, ink and marker on found paper
December 17, 2009


Tuesday, July 26, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 107

Title: ...for a whale-ship was my Yale College and my Harvard.

11 x 7.75 inches
ballpoint pen and ink on found paper
December 16, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 106

Title: Whaling not respectable? Whaling is imperial! By old English statutory law, the whale is declared "a royal fish".

10 x 6.25 inches
colored pencil, ink and spray paint on found paper
December 15, 2009


Monday, July 25, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 105

Title: The whale has no famous author, and whaling no famous chronicler...

6.75 x 8.5 inches
crayon on found paper
December 15, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 104

Title: Why did the Dutch in DeWitt's time have admirals of their whaling fleets?

11 x 7.75 inches
colored pencil and ink on found paper
December 14, 2009


Sunday, July 24, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 103

Title: ...let me assure ye that many a veteran who has freely marched up to a battery, would quickly recoil at the apparition of the sperm whale's vast tail, fanning into eddies the air over his head.

11 x 8.5 inches
acrylic paint, colored pencil and ink on found paper
December 13, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 102

Title: ...better is it to perish in that howling infinite, than be ingloriously dashed upon the lee...

11 x 7.75 inches
ink on found paper
December 12, 2009


Saturday, July 23, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 101

Title: Ship and boat diverged; the cold, damp night breeze blew between; a screaming gull flew overhead; the two hulls wildly rolled; we gave three heavy-hearted cheers, and blindly plunged like fate into the lone Atlantic.

11 x 8.5 inches
ink on found paper
December 11, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 100

Title: As for Peleg himself, he took it more like a philosopher; but for all his philosophy, there was a tear twinkling in his eye, when the lantern came too near.

11 x 8.25 inches
acrylic paint, ink and spraypaint on found paper
December 10, 2009


Friday, July 22, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 099

Title: That was my first kick.

11 x 8.25 inches
colored pencil and marker on found paper
December 10, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 098

Title: Meantime, overseeing the other part of the ship, Captain Peleg ripped and swore astern in the most frightful manner.

7.25 x 11 inches
colored pencil, ink and marker on found paper
December 9, 2009


Thursday, July 21, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 097

Title: It was now clear sunrise.

7.75 x 11 inches
ink on found paper
December 8, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 096

Title: "Face!" said I, "call that his face?"

10.5 x 8.5 inches
colored pencil and marker on found paper
December 7, 2009


Wednesday, July 20, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 095

Title: Seeing a light, we went down, and found only an old rigger there, wrapped in a tattered pea-jacket. He was thrown at whole length upon two chests, his face downwards and inclosed in his folded arms. The profoundest slumber slept upon him.

8.25 x 10.5 inches
ballpoint pen on found paper
December 6, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 094

Title: It was nearly six o'clock, but only grey imperfect misty dawn, when we drew nigh the wharf.

8.25 x 5.5 inches
colored pencil on found paper
December 31, 2010

(This is the second version of this illustration, and was re-drawn much later. I will post the first version, along with the other alternate versions I did for other pages, after I finish posting all 552 of the Moby-Dick illustrations that were published in my book Moby-Dick in Pictures.)


Tuesday, July 19, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 093

Title: And like a sister of charity did this charitable Aunt Charity bustle about hither and thither, ready to turn her hand and heart to anything that promised to yield safety, comfort, and consolation to all on board a ship in which her beloved brother Bildad was concerned...

11 x 8 inches
crayon, ink and marker on found paper
December 2, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 092

Title: ...and the men employed in the hold and on the rigging were working till long after night-fall.

7.75 x 11 inches
ink on found paper
November 29, 2009


Monday, July 18, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 091

Title: But we had not gone perhaps above a hundred yards, when chancing to turn a corner, and looking back as I did so, who should be seen but Elijah following us, though at a distance.

11 x 7.75 inches
ink and marker on found paper
November 29, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 090

Title: "My friend," said I, "what all this gibberish of yours is about, I don't know, and I don't much care; for it seems to me that you must be a little damaged in the head."

11 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
November 29, 2009


Sunday, July 17, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 089

Title: "Anything down there about your souls?"

8.5 x 6.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
November 28, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 088

Title: ...the above words were put to us by a stranger, who, pausing before us, levelled his massive forefinger at the vessel in question. He was but shabbily apparelled in faded jacket and patched trowsers; a rag of a black handkerchief investing his neck. A confluent small-pox had in all directions flowed over his face, and left it like the complicated ribbed bed of a torrent, when the rushing waters have been dried up.

8.5 x 6.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
November 27, 2009


Saturday, July 16, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 087

Title: Quohog - his mark

8.25 x 11 inches
colored pencil on found paper
November 27, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 086

Title: "Cap'ain, you see him small drop tar on water dere? You see him? well, spose him one whale eye, well, den!" and taking sharp aim at it, he darted the iron right over old Bildad's broad brim, clean across the ship's decks, and struck the glistening tar spot out of sight.

8.25 x 10.5 inches
ink and marker on found paper
September 26, 2010

(This is the second version of this illustration, and was re-drawn much later. I will post the first version, along with the other alternate versions I did for other pages, after I finish posting all 552 of the Moby-Dick illustrations that were published in my book Moby-Dick in Pictures.)


Friday, July 15, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 085

Title: "No," said Peleg, "and he hasn't been baptized right either, or it would have washed some of that devil's blue off his face."

11 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint and colored pencil on found paper
November 26, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 084

Title: ...we sallied out to board the Pequod, sauntering along, and picking our teeth with halibut bones.

11 x 8.25 inches
colored pencil, ink, marker and pencil on found paper
November 26, 2009


Thursday, July 14, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 083

Title: "...hell is an idea first born on an undigested apple-dumpling..."

9.5 x 6.75 inches
crayon, ink and marker on found paper
November 24, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 082

Title: But previous to turning in, I took my heavy bearskin jacket, and threw it over him, as it promised to be a very cold night...

11 x 8 inches
acrylic paint, colored pencil and ink on found paper
November 23, 2009


Wednesday, July 13, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 081

Title: ...and there, good heavens! there sat Queequeg, altogether cool and self-collected; right in the middle of the room; squatting on his hams, and holding Yojo on top of his head. He looked neither one way nor the other way, but sat like a carved image with scarce a sign of active life.

9.5 x 6.75 inches
colored pencil and ink on found paper
November 22, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 080

Title: Apoplexy!

11 x 8 inches
ink, marker and pencil on found paper
November 21, 2009


Tuesday, July 12, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 079

Title: ...Heaven have mercy on us all - Presbyterians and Pagans alike - for we are all somehow dreadfully cracked about the head, and sadly need mending.

7.5 x 11 inches
ink on found paper
November 21, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 078

Title: "Besides, my boy, he has a wife—not three voyages wedded—a sweet, resigned girl."

9 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint, ink and collage on found paper
November 18, 2009


Monday, July 11, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 077

Title: But I had not proceeded far, when I began to bethink me that the captain with whom I was to sail yet remained unseen by me...

7.75 x 6 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
November 18, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 076

Title: "Fiery pit! fiery pit! ye insult me, man; past all natural bearing, ye insult me. It's an all-fired outrage to tell any human creature that he's bound to hell. Flukes and flames!"

7.75 x 11 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
November 17, 2009


Sunday, July 10, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 075

Title: "Thou Bildad!" roared Peleg, starting up and clattering about the cabin. "Blast ye, Captain Bildad, if I had followed thy advice in these matters, I would afore now had a conscience to lug about that would be heavy enough to founder the largest ship that ever sailed round Cape Horn."

11 x 7.75 inches
ballpoint pen and ink on found paper
November 16, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 074

Title: I was also aware that being a green hand at whaling, my own lay would not be very large; but considering that I was used to the sea, could steer a ship, splice a rope, and all that, I made no doubt that from all I had heard I should be offered at least the 275th lay — that is, the 275th part of the clear net proceeds of the voyage, whatever that might eventually amount to.

7.5 x 11 inches
ink and marker on found paper
November 15, 2009


Saturday, July 9, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 073

Title: His own person was the exact embodiment of his utilitarian character. On his long, gaunt body, he carried no spare flesh, no superfluous beard, his chin having a soft, economical nap to it, like the worn nap of his broad-brimmed hat.

11 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint, colored pencil and ink on found paper
November 14, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 072

Title: ...the sight of many unclad, lovely island creatures, round the Horn...

10.75 x 8.5 inches
acrylic paint and collage on found paper
November 13, 2009


Friday, July 8, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 071

Title: ...who has also by the stillness and seclusion of many long night-watches in the remotest waters, and beneath constellations never seen here at the north, been led to think untraditionally and independently...

11 x 7.75 inches
colored pencil, ink and marker on found paper
November 12, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 070

Title: Going forward and glancing over the weather bow, I perceived that the ship swinging to her anchor with the flood-tide, was now obliquely pointing towards the open ocean. The prospect was unlimited, but exceedingly monotonous and forbidding; not the slightest variety that I could see.

7.75 x 11 inches
ink on found paper
November 10, 2009


Thursday, July 7, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 069

Title: "Lost by a whale! Young man, come nearer to me: it was devoured, chewed up, crunched by the monstrousest parmacetty that ever chipped a boat!—ah, ah!"

9.5 x 7 inches
ink and marker on found paper
November 9, 2009


MOBY-DICK, page 068

Title: There was nothing so very particular, perhaps, about the appearance of the elderly man I saw; he was brown and brawny, like most old seamen, and heavily rolled up in blue pilot-cloth, cut in the Quaker style; only there was a fine and almost microscopic net-work of the minutest wrinkles interlacing round his eyes...

11 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint, colored pencil, ink and marker on found paper
November 8, 2009