Monday, October 31, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 301

Title: ...there, that blood-dripping head hung to the Pequod's waist like the giant Holofernes's from the girdle of Judith.

8 x 5 inches
collage and ink on found paper
July 8, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 300

Title: Thus, while in life the great whale's body may have been a real terror to his foes, in his death his ghost becomes a powerless panic to a world.

7.75 x 10.75 inches
acrylic paint, charcoal and ink on found paper
July 7, 2010


Sunday, October 30, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 299

Title: Beneath the unclouded and mild azure sky, upon the fair face of the pleasant sea, wafted by the joyous breezes, that great mass of death floats on and on, till lost in infinite perspectives.

10.75 x 30 inches
acrylic paint, colored pencil and ink on found paper
July 5, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 298

Title: ...when seamen fall overboard, they are sometimes found, months afterwards, perpendicularly frozen into the hearts of fields of ice, as a fly is found glued in amber.

9.5 x 8.75 inches
acrylic paint, ballpoint pen and ink on found paper
July 4, 2010


Saturday, October 29, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 297

Title: In life, the visible surface of the Sperm Whale is not the least among the many marvels he presents. Almost invariably it is all over obliquely crossed and re-crossed with numberless straight marks in thick array, something like those in the finest Italian line engravings.

8.5 x 5.5 inches
ink on found paper
July 3, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 296

Title: Already you know what his blubber is. That blubber is something of the consistence of firm, close-grained beef, but tougher, more elastic and compact, and ranges from eight or ten to twelve and fifteen inches in thickness.

7.75 x 10.75 inches
ink and marker on found paper
July 2, 2010


Friday, October 28, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 295

Title: Now as the blubber envelopes the whale precisely as the rind does an orange, so is it stripped off from the body precisely as an orange is sometimes stripped by spiralizing it. For the strain constantly kept up by the windlass continually keeps the whale rolling over and over in the water, and as the blubber in one strip uniformly peels off along the line called the "scarf," simultaneously cut by the spades of Starbuck and Stubb, the mates; and just as fast as it is thus peeled off, and indeed by that very act itself, it is all the time being hoisted higher and higher aloft till its upper end grazes the main-top...

10.5 x 7.5 inches
acrylic paint, ballpoint pen and ink on found paper
July 1, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 294

Title: ...to this block the great blubber hook, weighing some one hundred pounds, was attached.

10 x 7.25 inches
ballpoint pen on found paper
June 29, 2010


Thursday, October 27, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 293

Title: They viciously snapped, not only at each other's disembowelments, but like flexible bows, bent round, and bit their own; till those entrails seemed swallowed over and over again by the same mouth, to be oppositely voided by the gaping wound.

7.5 x 8 inches
ballpoint pen on found paper
June 28, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 292

Title: But Stubb, he eats the whale by its own light, does he?

10.75 x 7.25 inches
ink and marker on found paper
June 27, 2010


Wednesday, October 26, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 291

Title: But no doubt the first man that ever murdered an ox was regarded as a murderer...

8.5 x 6.75 inches
acrylic paint, ink and marker on found paper
June 26, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 290

Title: It is upon record, that three centuries ago the tongue of the Right Whale was esteemed a great delicacy in France, and commanded large prices there.

5 x 7.75 inches
ink on found paper
June 25, 2010


Tuesday, October 25, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 289

Title: "Up dere," said Fleece, holding his tongs straight over his head, and keeping it there very solemnly.

7.75 x 5 inches
acrylic paint, ballpoint pen, ink and marker on found paper
June 25, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 288

Title: Faintly smacking his withered lips over it for a moment, the old negro muttered, "Best cooked 'teak I eber taste; joosy, berry joosy."

7.75 x 5 inches
acrylic paint, ballpoint pen and marker on found paper
June 24, 2010


Monday, October 24, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 287

Title: "You is sharks, sartin; but if you gobern de shark in you, why den you be angel; for all angel is not'ing more dan de shark well goberned."

7.75 x 5 inches
ink and marker on found paper
June 23, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 286

Title: Sullenly taking the offered lantern, old Fleece limped across the deck to the bulwarks; and then, with one hand dropping his light low over the sea, so as to get a good view of his congregation, with the other hand he solemnly flourished his tongs, and leaning far over the side in a mumbling voice began addressing the sharks...

7.75 x 5 inches
ballpoint pen, ink and marker on found paper
June 22, 2010


Sunday, October 23, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 285

Title: ...this old Fleece, as they called him, came shuffling and limping along...

8.5 x 6.75 inches
acrylic paint, ink and marker on found paper
June 20, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 284

Title: Nor was Stubb the only banqueter on whale's flesh that night. Mingling their mumblings with his own mastications, thousands on thousands of sharks, swarming round the dead leviathan, smackingly feasted on its fatness.

10.75 x 7.75 inches
ink and marker on found paper
June 19, 2010


Saturday, October 22, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 283

Title: Though, in overseeing the pursuit of this whale, Captain Ahab had evinced his customary activity, to call it so; yet now that the creature was dead, some vague dissatisfaction, or impatience, or despair, seemed working in him; as if the sight of that dead body reminded him that Moby Dick was yet to be slain; and though a thousand other whales were brought to his ship, all that would not one jot advance his grand, monomaniac object.

10.5 x 8.5 inches
acrylic paint, ballpoint pen and ink on found paper
June 18, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 282

Title: Stubb's whale had been killed some distance from the ship. It was a calm; so, forming a tandem of three boats, we commenced the slow business of towing the trophy to the Pequod.

10.75 x 7.75 inches
ballpoint pen and ink on found paper
June 17, 2010


Friday, October 21, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 281

Title: The crotch alluded to on a previous page deserves independent mention. It is a notched stick of a peculiar form, some two feet in length, which is perpendicularly inserted into the starboard gunwale near the bow, for the purpose of furnishing a rest for the wooden extremity of the harpoon, whose other naked, barbed end slopingly projects from the prow. Thereby the weapon is instantly at hand to its hurler, who snatches it up as readily from its rest as a backwoodsman swings his rifle from the wall.

8 x 11 inches
acrylic paint on found paper
June 14, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 280

Title: But however prolonged and exhausting the chase, the harpooneer is expected to pull his oar meanwhile to the uttermost; indeed, he is expected to set an example of superhuman activity to the rest, not only by incredible rowing, but by repeated loud and intrepid exclamations...

8.5 x 6.75 inches
colored pencil, ink and marker on found paper
June 13, 2010


Thursday, October 20, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 279

Title: At last, gush after gush of clotted red gore, as if it had been the purple lees of red wine, shot into the frighted air; and falling back again, ran dripping down his motionless flanks into the sea. His heart had burst!

10.75 x 7.75 inches
ink on found paper
June 13, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 278

Title: The red tide now poured from all sides of the monster like brooks down a hill. His tormented body rolled not in brine but in blood, which bubbled and seethed for furlongs behind in their wake. The slanting sun playing upon this crimson pond in the sea, sent back its reflection into every face, so that they all glowed to each other like red men.

10.75 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint, ballpoint pen, colored pencil and ink on found paper
June 13, 2010


Wednesday, October 19, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 277

Title: Like desperadoes they tugged and they strained, till the welcome cry was heard — "Stand up, Tashtego! — give it to him!" The harpoon was hurled.

11.5 x 18 inches
acrylic paint, ink and marker on found paper
June 12, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 276

Title: Yes, a mighty change had come over the fish. All alive to his jeopardy, he was going "head out;" that part obliquely projecting from the mad yeast which he brewed.

12 x 9 inches
acrylic paint, collage, ink, marker and pencil on found paper
June 12, 2010


Tuesday, October 18, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 275

Title: The waves, too, nodded their indolent crests; and across the wide trance of the sea, east nodded to west, and the sun over all.

8 x 12 inches
ink, marker and watercolor on watercolor paper
June 11, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 274

Title: "When you see him 'quid", said the savage, honing his harpoon in the bow of his hoisted boat, "then you quick see him 'parm whale."

7.75 x 10.75 inches
colored pencil, ink and marker on found paper
June 8, 2010


Monday, October 17, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 273

Title: ...previous to that connexion, the short-warp goes through sundry mystifications too tedious to detail.

8 x 4.75 inches
ink and marker on found paper
June 7, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 272

Title: As the least tangle or kink in the coiling would, in running out, infallibly take somebody's arm, leg, or entire body off...

7.75 x 10.75 inches
acrylic paint on found paper
June 7, 2010


Sunday, October 16, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 271

Title: Hemp is a dusky, dark fellow, a sort of Indian; but Manilla is as a golden-haired Circassian to behold.

10.75 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint, colored pencil and ink on found paper
June 7, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 270

Title: For though other species of whales find their food above water, and may be seen by man in the act of feeding, the Spermaceti Whale obtains his whole food in unknown zones below the surface; and only by inference is it that any one can tell of what, precisely, that food consists.

15.5 x 7 inches
ink and marker on found paper
June 6, 2010


Saturday, October 15, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 269

Title: The four boats were soon on the water; Ahab's in advance, and all swiftly pulling towards their prey. Soon it went down, and while, with oars suspended, we were awaiting its reappearance, lo! in the same spot where it sank, once more it slowly rose. Almost forgetting for the moment all thoughts of Moby Dick, we now gazed at the most wondrous phenomenon which the secret seas have hitherto revealed to mankind. A vast pulpy mass, furlongs in length and breadth, of a glancing cream-color, lay floating on the water, innumerable long arms radiating from its centre, and curling and twisting like a nest of anacondas, as if blindly to clutch at any hapless object within reach. No perceptible face or front did it have; no conceivable token of either sensation or instinct; but undulated there on the billows, an unearthly, formless, chance-like apparition of life.

9 x 12 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
June 5, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 268

Title: In the distance, a great white mass lazily rose, and rising higher and higher, and disentangling itself from the azure, at last gleamed before our prow like a snow-slide, new slid from the hills. Thus glistening for a moment, as slowly it subsided, and sank. Then once more arose, and silently gleamed.

10.75 x 15.5 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
June 3, 2010


Friday, October 14, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 267

Title: Yea; foolish mortals, Noah's flood is not yet subsided; two thirds of the fair world it yet covers.

10.25 x 7.25 inches
acrylic paint on found paper
June 3, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 266

Title: As morning mowers, who side by side slowly and seethingly advance their scythes through the long wet grass of marshy meads; even so these monsters swam, making a strange, grassy, cutting sound; and leaving behind them endless swaths of blue upon the yellow sea.

7.75 x 10.75 inches
ink and marker on found paper
June 2, 2010


Thursday, October 13, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 265

Title: Nor when expandingly lifted by your subject, can you fail to trace out great whales in the starry heavens...

8.25 x 11.25 inches
ink and marker on found paper
May 31, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 264

Title: In bony, ribby regions of the earth, where at the base of high broken cliffs masses of rock lie strewn in fantastic groupings upon the plain, you will often discover images as of the petrified forms of the Leviathan partly merged in grass, which of a windy day breaks against them in a surf of green surges.

10.25 x 7.25 inches
acrylic paint, charcoal, colored pencil, ink and pencil on found paper
May 31, 2010


Wednesday, October 12, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 263

Title: Throughout the Pacific, and also in Nantucket, and New Bedford, and Sag Harbor, you will come across lively sketches of whales and whaling-scenes, graven by the fishermen themselves on Sperm Whale-teeth...

10.5 x 8 inches
ink and marker on found paper
May 30, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 262

Title: It is a quiet noon-scene among the isles of the Pacific; a French whaler anchored, inshore, in a calm, and lazily taking water on board...

6 x 8 inches
watercolor on watercolor paper
May 30, 2010


Tuesday, October 11, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 261

Title: And all the while the thick-lipped Leviathan is rushing through the deep, leaving tons of tumultuous white curds in his wake...

11 x 8.5 inches
acrylic paint, charcoal, colored pencil, ink and pencil on found paper
May 28, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 260

Title: His jets are erect, full, and black like soot...

7.75 x 5 inches
ink and marker on found paper
May 27, 2010


Monday, October 10, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 259

Title: For all these reasons, then, any way you may look at it, you must needs conclude that the great Leviathan is that one creature in the world which must remain unpainted to the last. True, one portrait may hit the mark much nearer than another, but none can hit it with any very considerable degree of exactness. So there is no earthly way of finding out precisely what the whale really looks like.

12 x 9 inches
marker on found paper
May 26, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 258

Title: The living whale, in his full majesty and significance, is only to be seen at sea in unfathomable waters; and afloat the vast bulk of him is out of sight, like a launched line-of-battle ship...

10.75 x 29.75 inches
collage, ink and pencil on found paper
May 26, 2010


Sunday, October 9, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 257

Title: But the placing of the cap-sheaf to all this blundering business was reserved for the scientific Frederick Cuvier, brother to the famous Baron. In 1836, he published a Natural History of Whales, in which he gives what he calls a picture of the Sperm Whale. Before showing that picture to any Nantucketer, you had best provide for your summary retreat from Nantucket. In a word, Frederick Cuvier's Sperm Whale is not a Sperm Whale, but a squash.

10.75 x 8 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
May 25, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 256

Title: In the vignettes and other embellishments of some ancient books you will at times meet with very curious touches at the whale, where all manner of spouts, jets d'eau, hot springs and cold, Saratoga and Baden-Baden, come bubbling up from his unexhausted brain.

7.75 x 10.75 inches
ink and marker on found paper
May 23, 2010


Saturday, October 8, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 255

Title: The Hindoo whale referred to, occurs in a separate department of the wall, depicting the incarnation of Vishnu in the form of Leviathan, learnedly known as the Matse Avatar.

11 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint, ballpoint pen, colored pencil, ink and marker on found paper
May 23, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 254

Title: It may be worth while, therefore, previously to advert to those curious imaginary portraits of him which even down to the present day confidently challenge the faith of the landsman. It is time to set the world right in this matter, by proving such pictures of the whale all wrong.

7.75 x 10 inches
ink on found paper
May 21, 2010


Friday, October 7, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 253

Title: "...but upon the island of Nantucket, the widow of Radney still turns to the sea which refuses to give up its dead; still in dreams sees the awful white whale that destroyed him."

7.75 x 11 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
May 19, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 252

Title: "But, at some distance, Moby Dick rose again, with some tatters of Radney's red woollen shirt, caught in the teeth that had destroyed him."

11 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
May 18, 2010