Saturday, December 31, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 423

Title: "Presently up breaches from the bottom of the sea a bouncing great whale, with a milky-white head and hump, all crows' feet and wrinkles."

15.5 x 10.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
October 25, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 422

Title: With his ivory arm frankly thrust forth in welcome, the other captain advanced, and Ahab, putting out his ivory leg, and crossing the ivory arm (like two sword-fish blades) cried out in his walrus way, "Aye, aye, hearty! let us shake bones together!—an arm and a leg! - an arm that never can shrink, d'ye see; and a leg that never can run. Where did'st thou see the White Whale? - how long ago?"

7.75 x 10.75 inches
acrylic paint, charcoal and ink on found paper
October 24, 2010


Friday, December 30, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 421

Title: He was a darkly-tanned, burly, good-natured, fine-looking man, of sixty or thereabouts, dressed in a spacious roundabout, that hung round him in festoons of blue pilot-cloth; and one empty arm of this jacket streamed behind him like the broidered arm of a huzzar's surcoat.

11 x 8 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
October 24, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 420

Title: "Here's the ship's navel, this doubloon here, and they are all on fire to unscrew it. But, unscrew your navel, and what's the consequence? Then again, if it stays here, that is ugly, too, for when aught's nailed to the mast it's a sign that things grow desperate. Ha, ha! old Ahab! the White Whale; he'll nail ye!"

10.75 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
October 24, 2010


Thursday, December 29, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 419

Title: "I see nothing here, but a round thing made of gold, and whoever raises a certain whale, this round thing belongs to him. So, what's all this staring been about?"

10.75 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint, ballpoint pen, charcoal and ink on found paper
October 23, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 418

Title: "Well; the sun he wheels among 'em. Aye, here on the coin he's just crossing the threshold between two of twelve sitting-rooms all in a ring."

10.75 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint, ink and marker on found paper
October 23, 2010


Wednesday, December 28, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 417

Title: "So in this vale of Death, God girds us round; and over all our gloom, the sun of Righteousness still shines a beacon and a hope. If we bend down our eyes, the dark vale shows her mouldy soil; but if we lift them, the bright sun meets our glance half way, to cheer."

10.75 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint, ink and marker on found paper
October 21, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 416

Title: "The firm tower, that is Ahab; the volcano, that is Ahab; the courageous, the undaunted, and victorious fowl, that, too, is Ahab; all are Ahab; and this round gold is but the image of the rounder globe, which, like a magician's glass, to each and every man in turn but mirrors back his own mysterious self."

10.75 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint, charcoal, colored pencil and ink on found paper
October 21, 2010


Tuesday, December 27, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 415

Title: But one morning, turning to pass the doubloon, he seemed to be newly attracted by the strange figures and inscriptions stamped on it, as though now for the first time beginning to interpret for himself in some monomaniac way whatever significance might lurk in them.

8.5 x 11 inches
acrylic paint, ink and pencil on found paper
October 19, 2010



MOBY-DICK, page 414

Title: But mark: aloft there, at the three mast heads, stand three men intent on spying out more whales...

8.25 x 11.5 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
October 19, 2010


Monday, December 26, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 413

Title: The unmanufactured sperm oil possesses a singularly cleansing virtue.

10.75 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
October 17, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 412

Title: But the whaleman, as he seeks the food of light, so he lives in light.

10.25 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
October 17, 2010


Sunday, December 25, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 411

Title: And there is a Catskill eagle in some souls that can alike dive down into the blackest gorges, and soar out of them again and become invisible in the sunny spaces.

9.25 x 6 inches
ink and marker on found paper
October 17, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 410

Title: A stark, bewildered feeling, as of death, came over me.

9.75 x 8.5 inches
acrylic paint on found paper
October 17, 2010


Saturday, December 24, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 409

Title: ...as the wind howled on, and the sea leaped, and the ship groaned and dived, and yet steadfastly shot her red hell further and further into the blackness of the sea and the night, and scornfully champed the white bone in her mouth, and viciously spat round her on all sides; then the rushing Pequod, freighted with savages, and laden with fire, and burning a corpse, and plunging into that blackness of darkness, seemed the material counterpart of her monomaniac commander's soul.

7.5 x 9 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
October 17, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 408

Title: It smells like the left wing of the day of judgment; it is an argument for the pit.

10.75 x 15.5 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
October 14, 2010


Friday, December 23, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 407

Title: While employed in polishing them—one man in each pot, side by side—many confidential communications are carried on, over the iron lips.

7.75 x 11 inches
acrylic paint and pencil on found paper
October 14, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 406

Title: Arrayed in decent black; occupying a conspicuous pulpit; intent on bible leaves; what a candidate for an archbishoprick, what a lad for a Pope were this mincer!

9.75 x 6.25 inches
ink on construction paper
October 12, 2010


Thursday, December 22, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 405

Title: Had you stepped on board the Pequod at a certain juncture of this post-mortemizing of the whale; and had you strolled forward nigh the windlass, pretty sure am I that you would have scanned with no small curiosity a very strange, enigmatical object, which you would have seen there, lying along lengthwise in the lee scuppers.

10.75 x 7.25 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
October 11, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 404

Title: There is another substance, and a very singular one, which turns up in the course of this business, but which I feel it to be very puzzling adequately to describe. It is called slobgollion; an appellation original with the whalemen, and even so is the nature of the substance. It is an ineffably oozy, stringy affair, most frequently found in the tubs of sperm, after a prolonged squeezing, and subsequent decanting. I hold it to be the wondrously thin, ruptured membranes of the case, coalescing.

9.25 x 6.25 inches
acrylic paint and charcoal on found paper
October 10, 2010


Wednesday, December 21, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 403

Title: Squeeze! squeeze! squeeze! all the morning long; I squeezed that sperm till I myself almost melted into it; I squeezed that sperm till a strange sort of insanity came over me; and I found myself unwittingly squeezing my co-laborers' hands in it, mistaking their hands for the gentle globules. Such an abounding, affectionate, friendly, loving feeling did this avocation beget; that at last I was continually squeezing their hands, and looking up into their eyes sentimentally...

9.25 x 6.25 inches
acrylic paint, ink and pencil on found paper
October 10, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 402

Title: Not drowned entirely, though. Rather carried down alive to wondrous depths, where strange shapes of the unwarped primal world glided to and fro before his passive eyes; and the miser-merman, Wisdom, revealed his hoarded heaps; and among the joyous, heartless, ever-juvenile eternities, Pip saw the multitudinous, God-omnipresent, coral insects, that out of the firmament of waters heaved the colossal orbs.

6 x 9.5 inches
ink on watercolor paper
October 10, 2010


Tuesday, December 20, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 401

Title: The sea had jeeringly kept his finite body up, but drowned the infinite of his soul.

10.25 x 7.25 inches
acrylic paint on found paper
October 9, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 400

Title: Tashtego stood in the bows. He was full of the fire of the hunt.

5.5 x 8 inches
acrylic paint on found paper
October 5, 2010


Monday, December 19, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 399

Title: Then come out those fiery effulgences, infernally superb; then the evil-blazing diamond, once the divinest symbol of the crystal skies, looks like some crown-jewel stolen from the King of Hell.

10.75 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint on found paper
October 4, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 398

Title: It was but some few days after encountering the Frenchman, that a most significant event befell the most insignificant of the Pequod's crew; an event most lamentable; and which ended in providing the sometimes madly merry and predestinated craft with a living and ever accompanying prophecy of whatever shattered sequel might prove her own.

10.75 x 7.75 inches
ink and marker on found paper
October 3, 2010


Sunday, December 18, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 397

Title: ...which latter name is the one used by the learned Fogo Von Slack, in his great work on Smells, a textbook on that subject.

11 x 8 inches
acrylic paint, charcoal and pencil on found paper
October 2, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 396

Title: Bethink thee of that saying of St. Paul in Corinthians, about corruption and incorruption; how that we are sown in dishonor, but raised in glory.

10.75 x 7 inches
ink and marker on found paper
October 1, 2010


Saturday, December 17, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 395

Title: Dropping his spade, he thrust both hands in, and drew out handfuls of something that looked like ripe Windsor soap, or rich mottled old cheese; very unctuous and savory withal. You might easily dent it with your thumb; it is of a hue between yellow and ash color. And this, good friends, is ambergris, worth a gold guinea an ounce to any druggist.

11.25 x 8.5 inches
acrylic paint on found paper
September 30, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 394

Title: "Why, let me see; yes, you may as well tell him now that — that — in fact, tell him I've diddled him, and (aside to himself) perhaps somebody else."

9.25 x 6 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
September 30, 2010


Friday, December 16, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 393

Title: By this time their destined victim appeared from his cabin. He was a small and dark, but rather delicate looking man for a sea-captain, with large whiskers and moustache, however; and wore a red cotton velvet vest with watch-seals at his side.

12 x 6 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
September 30, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 392

Title: Others having broken the stems of their pipes almost short off at the bowl, were vigorously puffing tobacco-smoke, so that it constantly filled their olfactories.

10.75 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
September 29, 2010


Thursday, December 15, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 391

Title: Drawing across her bow, he perceived that in accordance with the fanciful French taste, the upper part of her stem-piece was carved in the likeness of a huge drooping stalk, was painted green, and for thorns had copper spikes projecting from it here and there; the whole terminating in a symmetrical folded bulb of a bright red color.

10.75 x 8 inches
acrylic paint on found paper
September 28, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 390

Title: Coming still nearer with the expiring breeze, we saw that the Frenchman had a second whale alongside; and this second whale seemed even more of a nosegay than the first. In truth, it turned out to be one of those problematical whales that seem to dry up and die with a sort of prodigious dyspepsia, or indigestion; leaving their defunct bodies almost entirely bankrupt of anything like oil.

6.5 x 5.25 inches
ink on found paper
September 27, 2010


Wednesday, December 14, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 389

Title: Presently, the vapors in advance slid aside; and there in the distance lay a ship, whose furled sails betokened that some sort of whale must be alongside. As we glided nearer, the stranger showed French colors from his peak; and by the eddying cloud of vulture sea-fowl that circled, and hovered, and swooped around him, it was plain that the whale alongside must be what the fishermen call a blasted whale, that is, a whale that has died unmolested on the sea, and so floated an unappropriated corpse.

7.75 x 10.75 inches
acrylic paint, ink and marker on found paper
September 27, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 388

Title: But is the Queen a mermaid, to be presented with a tail? An allegorical meaning may lurk here.

12 x 9 inches
collage on construction paper and chipboard
September 26, 2010


Tuesday, December 13, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 387

Title: "Please, Sir, who is the Lord Warden?"

"The Duke."

"But the duke had nothing to do with taking this fish?"

"It is his."

"We have been at great trouble, and peril, and some expense, and is all that to go to the Duke's benefit; we getting nothing at all for our pains but our blisters?"

"It is his."

"Is the Duke so very poor as to be forced to this desperate mode of getting a livelihood?"

"It is his."

"I thought to relieve my old bed-ridden mother by part of my share of this whale."

"It is his."

"Won't the Duke be content with a quarter or a half?"

"It is his."

8.5 x 6 inches
ink and marker on found paper
September 25, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 386

Title: "De balena vero sufficit, si rex habeat caput, et regina caudam."

Bracton, l 3. c. 3.

Latin from the books of the Laws of England, which taken along with the context, means, that of all whales captured by anybody on the coast of that land, the King, as Honorary Grand Harpooneer, must have the head, and the Queen be respectfully presented with the tail. A division which, in the whale, is much like halving an apple; there is no intermediate remainder.

7 x 12 inches
acrylic paint, collage and ink on construction paper
September 24, 2010


Monday, December 12, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 385

Title: What all men's minds and opinions but Loose-Fish?

12 x 8.25 inches
ink and watercolor on watercolor paper
September 24, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 384

Title: ...though the gentleman had originally harpooned the lady, and had once had her fast, and only by reason of the great stress of her plunging viciousness, had as last abandoned her; yet abandon her he did, so that she became a loose-fish...

11 x 8 inches
collage on wallpaper sample and chipboard
September 23, 2010


Sunday, December 11, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 383

Title: I. A Fast-Fish belongs to the party fast to it.

II. A Loose-Fish is fair game for anybody who can soonest catch it.

7 x 8.5 inches
acrylic paint, collage and ink on found paper
September 21, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 382

Title: Thus the most vexatious and violent disputes would often arise between the fishermen...

6 x 9.25 inches
collage and ink on found paper
September 20, 2010


Saturday, December 10, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 381

Title: Almost universally, a lone whale - as a solitary Leviathan is called - proves an ancient one.

7 x 8.5 inches
acrylic paint, colored pencil and ink on Bristol board
September 19, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 380

Title: ...he leaves his anonymous babies all over the world; every baby an exotic.

10.75 x 7.75 inches
ink and marker on found paper
September 18, 2010


Friday, December 9, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 379

Title: In cavalier attendance upon the school of females, you invariably see a male of full grown magnitude, but not old; who, upon any alarm, evinces his gallantry by falling in the rear and covering the flight of his ladies. In truth, this gentleman is a luxurious Ottoman, swimming about over the watery world...

10.75 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
September 17, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 378

Title: The waif is a pennoned pole, two or three of which are carried by every boat; and which, when additional game is at hand, are inserted upright into the floating body of a dead whale, both to mark its place on the sea, and also as token of prior possession, should the boats of any other ship draw near.

10.75 x 7.25 inches
acrylic paint, ink and pencil on found paper
September 16, 2010


Thursday, December 8, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 377

Title: But at length we perceived that by one of the unimaginable accidents of the fishery, this whale had become entangled in the harpoon-line that he towed; he had also run away with the cutting-spade in him; and while the free end of the rope attached to that weapon, had permanently caught in the coils of the harpoon-line round his tail, the cutting-spade itself had worked loose from his flesh. So that tormented to madness, he was now churning through the water, violently flailing with his flexible tail, and tossing the keen spade about him, wounding and murdering his own comrades.

10.75 x 7.75 inches
acrylic paint and ink on found paper
September 15, 2010


MOBY-DICK, page 376

Title: As when the stricken whale, that from the tub has reeled out hundreds of fathoms of rope; as, after deep sounding, he floats up again, and shows the slackened curling line buoyantly rising and spiralling towards the air; so now, Starbuck saw long coils of the umbilical cord of Madame Leviathan, by which the young cub seemed still tethered to its dam.

8 x 5.25 inches
colored pencil on found paper
September 15, 2010


Wednesday, December 7, 2016

MOBY-DICK, page 375

Title: But far beneath this wondrous world upon the surface, another and still stranger world met our eyes as we gazed over the side. For, suspended in those watery vaults, floated the forms of the nursing mothers of the whales, and those that by their enormous girth seemed shortly to become mothers.

12 x 8.25 inches
ink and marker on watercolor paper
September 14, 2010